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Administering an Enema to Your Dog

Administering an Enema to Your Dog

Sometimes, you may need to do more than just giving solid or liquid medication to your sick dog. Depending on his condition and symptoms, you may also have to provide other kinds of nursing care, such as giving enemas. Below is an effective way to use this procedure:

The use of enemas can be beneficial for dogs with the following conditions; constipation, during fasting, dehydration, excessive vomiting, bowel irritation caused by bone fragments or the presence of spoiled food or garbage in the digestive tract.

Before administering this procedure, make sure that you only use pure water that is warm but not hot (test it on your wrist to make sure). Use about two tablespoons for a small dog and up to a pint for a large dog. Add a few drops of freshly squeezed lemon juice to the water and administer the mixture with a plastic or rubber syringe for about 2 to 3 minutes. For large dogs, you can use and enema bag and a nozzle.

Here is how to do it: You must lubricate the end of the syringe with vegetable oil. Have someone help you hold the dog gently while he stands in a tub or on the ground. Insert the nozzle carefully into the rectum. Using gentle and consistent pressure against the anus (to prevent the fluid from leaking out), slowly fill the colon. If the solution does not flow in easily, pull back on the nozzle or syringe and slightly adjust the angle. Expect a bowel movement to begin within a few minutes. You may administer the enema once or twice a day for a couple of days.

In many cases, dogs that are dehydrated are simply retaining the fluid. This occurs when the colon absorbs the fluid which the body needs. Therefore, enemas are an excellent way to administer fluid therapy. Under these circumstances, administer the enema about every four hours or until fluid is no longer retained.

If a dog is having difficulty keeping water in his stomach due to heavy vomiting, an enema can help introduce the fluid and salts that are needed to replace those lost through vomiting. Using the solution as described earlier, add a pinch of sea salt plus a pinch of potassium chloride. The same solution can also be used to help a dog suffering from prolonged diarrhea. In this case, administer the enema every four hours or until fluid is no longer retained.

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